How to write a Bio

What is a BIO?

A bio is a summary of the highlights of your child’s career/goals — training, credits, and something about them personally, i.e. what they do when they are not acting. It tells the industry in sentence form—unlike the columns in your resume—what roles you can play and how to cast you.

Actor Profiles - Ipswich Photography Studio

Here are some guidelines for writing the best bio possible.

1. Make it short and sweet.  

Being direct in your bio is better than flowery or overly imaginative language. No more than 150 words.

2. Use third person. (Or write it with your child, then for your child.)  

This is not an autobiography, it’s a bio. Use subjects like—she/he, your name (Hannah), etc. It’s standard and doesn’t sound as elitist as you think it does. 

3. Avoid the cloying justification.  

For example, “I knew I wanted to be an actor at age 5 when I saw a magical production of Peter Pan.” Share what you’re child has done not why they do what they do.

4. Don’t make lists. 

Describe or elaborate your skills, training, and experience in sentence form. 

5. Include personal experiences and special skills.  

It’s important to describe your values and how they inform your upcoming career. Give up a little information telling the audience who you are as a person. By sharing who you are, you help your audience relate to you before you step foot on that stage. Who are you outside of acting/modeling? Pets, hobbies, odd jobs and funny anecdotes always fit well in this area. Be true to yourself.

Here’s a sample:

“Thomas Curtain lives in Brooklyn with his family and attends the Waterston School for the Performing Arts. He is in the fourth grade, and his favorite subjects are English and Social Studies. Thomas first appeared on Broadway at the age of six as Chip in Beauty and the Beast. He is best-known for playing Gavroche in Les Misérables, during the show’s final season on Broadway. Thomas also enjoys playing soccer and has recently begun learning to play the violin. Thomas would like to thank his mom, dad, and his sister Kate for their love and support. He also thanks director Frank Sutton for allowing him to enjoy this valuable experience. Thomas dedicates his performances this season to the memory of his late grandmother, Ruth Curtain, a former Broadway star who first instilled in him a love of performing.”